The story of Madulain

The story of Madulain

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Originally called Madulene and known until 1943 as Madulein, today’s Madulain is the smallest commune in the Upper Engadin; appropriately, many families still speak Romansh here. On a rocky outcrop above the village stand the ruins of the fortress of Guardaval, built by the bishop of Chur in 1251 – once the fief of the mighty Planta family, but never inhabited and already abandoned in the 15th century. The views from the ruins over the Engadin, however, are sublime. Also well worth a visit is the late-Gothic village church of San Batrumieu. This was built in 1510, shortly before Madulain separated definitively from its large neighbour, Zuoz, and became an independent commune (1543). For cross-country skiers, too, there are plenty of treats on the doorstep. The small, trim village with its 173 inhabitants and its typical Engadin houses lies right on the route of the Engadin Ski Marathon, and makes an ideal base for exploring the 180km (112 mile) trail network of the Engadin.



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